car wire fire the 12v source
12 Voly Housings
12 volt
car stereo
car security
 
 

 

 

Car Audio

Passive Crossover

A passive crossover is made entirely of passive components, arranged most commonly in a Cauer topology to achieve a Butterworth filter . Passive filters use non-reactive resistors combined with reactive components such as capacitors and inductors. Very high performance passive crossovers are likely to be more expensive than active crossovers since individual components capable of good performance at the high currents and voltages at which speaker systems are driven are hard to make, and expensive. Polypropylene , metalized polyester foil, and paper- electrolyte capacitors are common. Inductors may have air cores, powdered metal cores, ferrite cores or laminated silicon steel cores, and most are wound with enamelled copper wire. Some passive networks include devices such as fuse, PTC devices, bulbs or circuit breakers to protect the loudspeaker drivers from accidental overpowering. Modern passive crossovers increasingly incorporate equalization networks (e.g.,Zobel networks) that compensate for the changes in impedance with frequency inherent in virtually all loudspeakers. The issue is complex, as part of the change in impedance is due to acoustic loading changes across a driver's passband.

 

Low Pass/First Order

A Low-Pass Filter is a circuit that only allows low-frequency signals to pass, and attenuates or reduces signals whose frequencies exceed its cut-off frequency.  It is also referred to as a 'high-cut filter' or, when used in audio applications, as a 'treble-cut filter'. One common application of low-pass filters is for driving subwoofers (speakers designed for bass sounds) and other loudspeakers that don't efficiently broadcast sounds of high pitches. The low-pass filter is the opposite of the high pass filter. The quality of a low-pass filter may be expressed in terms of its n-order. An n-order filter reduces the signal strength by 6n dB for every octave increase in frequency, i.e., every time the frequency doubles. A first-order low-pass filter (n=1) will reduce the signal strength by 6 dB every time the frequency doubles. Mathematically, -6dB = 20 log P2/P1, which yields P2/P1 = 0.501.  This means that a first-order filter reduces the strength of the signal by about 50% every time the frequency doubles.

 

low-pass-crossover-passive

 

Hi Pass/First Order

A High-Pass Filter is a circuit that only allows high-frequency signals to pass, and attenuates or reduces signals whose frequencies are below its cut-off frequency.  It is also referred to as a 'low-cut filter' or, when used in audio applications, as a 'bass-cut filter' or 'rumble filter'. One common application of high-pass filters is for driving tweeters (speakers designed for high-pitch sounds), so as to block low-frequency signals that can interfere with or even damage the tweeter. The high-pass filter is the opposite of the low-pass filter. An ideal high-pass filter is one that completely blocks all frequencies below a given frequency, while allowing all those with higher frequencies to pass unchanged.  Of course, an ideal high-pass filter doesn't exist, so in the real world, the effectiveness and efficiency of a high-pass filter is described is terms of the level of attenuation of signals with frequencies below a cut-off frequency.  The cut-off frequency of a high-pass filter is the frequency at which the output voltage equals 70.7% of the input voltage.

 

hi-pass-crossover-passive

 

Bandpass/First Order

A bandpass filter is an electronic device or circuit that allows signals between two specific frequencies to pass, but that discriminates against signals at other frequencies. Some bandpass filters require an external source of power and employ active components such as transistors and integrated circuits; these are known as active bandpass filters. Other bandpass filters use no external source of power and consist only of passive components such as capacitors and inductors; these are called passive bandpass filters

 

bandpass-crossover-passive

 

 

 

 

 

 
 

 

 

 

 


 

Contact All Rights Reserved © Carwirefire.com Privacy Policy